17th century

Adding a dash or two of ice to history

I have spent the last few days thinking about ice. Partly, this is because it’s been very, very hot—so hot, I wouldn’t have minded a pile of crushed ice to roll around in. And then, of course, there are all the news reports about the disappearing ice—in the Artic, in the Himalayas, in Antarctica. Everywhere, […]

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An expensive folly – of an impressive castle and its somewhat less impressive master

Today, I am taking you on a guided tour through the past of one of Sweden’s most imposing surviving baroque castles, Läckö. I’ve had this castle on my bucket list for yonks—being a 17th century enthusiast sort of makes a visit mandatory—and some days ago, I finally made it there, standing for a silent moment

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Review of Rebel’s Knot – or “Wow, Ms Bazos does it again!”

Today, I am delighted to be hosting a stop on The Coffee Pot Book Club tour for Ms Bazos’ latest release, Rebel’s Knot. Some of you may recall that Cryssa Bazos has been my guest on this blog before, mainly because we share a passion for the 17th century – and LoTR! We also seem

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Not all treasure glimmers – of copper coins and rebel farmers

Hubby has a thing about The Curse of Oak Island. For those of you who don’t know what Oak Island is, it’s a TV series that has run for multiple seasons while two brothers dig their way across this little island in search of Templar treasure—treasure they believe the Templars carried off in secret after

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Glory and Gore – meet Cryssa, a LoTR fan with a thing about Charles II

Today’s 17th century enthusiast and I have a lot in common. Like a fascination with LoTR (Lord of the Rings for those among you who do not share this affliction). In Cryssa’s case, this means she has a complete set of LoTR figurines – still in their original packaging. Her then young sons wanted to

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The hand that held the axe that killed the king

I find it very improbable that there has ever been a little boy who looked up from his morning porridge and told his proud parents that when he grew up, he wanted to be an executioner. Nor do I think any parent would have been overly thrilled had their beloved son expressed such a desire.

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Glory and Gore – Meet American Katherine with a taste for 17th Century England

Well, dear readers, it is Thursday again, and this autumn this means it is time for our weekly date with yet another 17th century enthusiast. I stumbled upon one of my guest’s books a couple of years ago, a rather dark story involving fraternal twins and their anything but happy lives, this due to the

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Glory and Gore Galore – the fascinating 17th century & an upcoming blog event

As far back as I can remember, I’ve been fascinated by history. A lot of time during my childhood was spent (rather futilely) attempting to find a way to travel back in time, to eras where heroism was rife, where honour and integrity were taken for granted. Yes, yes, a very romanticised view on our

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The intolerant earl – from loyal servant to Tower prisoner

A week or so ago, I posted about the honourable Arthur Capell , a gentleman whose loyalty to his king, Charles I, ultimately lead to his execution. In that post I hinted  at the fate of his son and namesake, Arthur Jr. So, today I think we should spend some time with the younger Capell,

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Dying for his king – or how a would-be Parliamentarian ended up a dead Royalist

There is a picture in the National Portrait Gallery that I have always been particularly fond of. Originally, I was drawn to it more because of the formal garden in the background than the sitters in the foreground (this was when I was thinking BIG when it came to garden design), but every time I’ve

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