Women in history

His empress, his love – of Isabel, matriarch to the Spanish Hapsburgs

Early in March of 1526, Isabel of Portugal finally got her dream prince. At last! The groom, Holy Roman Emperor Carlos I (or Charles V, depending on who you’re asking) had originally been less than interested in the match with his first cousin, and for years Isabel had waited for the man to come to […]

His empress, his love – of Isabel, matriarch to the Spanish Hapsburgs Read More »

One son died young, one became an earl, one a bishop and one an abuser – the life of a medieval mother

Today, we’re going to spend some time with a woman called Elisabeth. Back in her day, there were many, many Elisabeths. And Eleanors. And Matildas. Our Elisabeth had the misfortune of a somewhat burdened surname. Being a de Montfort in 13th century England was not necessarily a good thing—at least not after the battle of

One son died young, one became an earl, one a bishop and one an abuser – the life of a medieval mother Read More »

The king’s lady – of Nicholaa de la Haye, defender of Lincoln, as presented by Sharon Bennett Connolly

Today, dear peeps, we’re going to be spending time in medieval England, more specifically in the reign of King John. This time and place was a man’s world where women rarely got more than a passing mantion by the (male) chroniclers. There were exceptions of course, and one such exception was Nicholaa de la Haye,

The king’s lady – of Nicholaa de la Haye, defender of Lincoln, as presented by Sharon Bennett Connolly Read More »

The abducted bride – the story of Ingrid Svantepolksdotter

Today, dear peeps, we’ll be lingering in 13th century Sweden. (Blame it on a recent road trip, which had me passing places that were once seats of power in the nascent kingdom of Sweden, now mostly are backwaters . . .) Now, the reason why this story caught my eye was because of a name:

The abducted bride – the story of Ingrid Svantepolksdotter Read More »

When Isabella of Austria became Elisabeth of Denmark – the story of a young queen

In Sweden, Kristian II of Denmark has the not-so-flattering epithet ”the tyrant”. After all, it was because of his duplicity that the streets of Stockholm ran red with blood one cold November night in 1520 as one after another of the Swedish nobles who’d fought against Danish dominion were summarily executed. In Denmark, obviously, he

When Isabella of Austria became Elisabeth of Denmark – the story of a young queen Read More »

Ms Ironbeard, King Hans and the failure of a royal marriage

Sometimes, I start out by researching one person and end up fascinated by another. In this particular case, I wanted to know more about Hans II, King of Denmark and Norway (“And Sweden!” he adds, but as he was only king here for like three years, I see that as more of a parenthesis) This

Ms Ironbeard, King Hans and the failure of a royal marriage Read More »

Dance, Salome, dance!

Sometimes, hubby and I spend several hours over the weekend solving crosswords. He is much better at it than I am, mainly because there are so many words/clues that only exist in the rarefied world of crossworders (is that even a word?) and he has been solving crosswords for yonks. Today, one of the clues

Dance, Salome, dance! Read More »

A slow march into permanent night – of a queen’s death

I have previously written about Eleanor of Castile, but in that post I focussed on the children she birthed. And lost. She lost most of them, unfortunate woman that she was. This post is about her last few years—mainly because that’s where I’ve been spending time with her, as my latest novel is set 1287-1290,

A slow march into permanent night – of a queen’s death Read More »

When Poppa met Rollo – Cathie Dunne gives us an insight into 9th century politics

Some weeks ago, I had the great pleasure of reading Cathie Dunne’s book about Poppa of Bayeux and her hubby Hrolfr, a.k.a. Rollo (To us Swedes, he is Gånge-Rolf, so named because he was so big and strong no horse could carry him, hence he had to walk. Gånge means walker) Anyway: I realised I

When Poppa met Rollo – Cathie Dunne gives us an insight into 9th century politics Read More »

The three brothers – the story of a Portuguese princess and how she was blamed for the sins of her sons

In 1214, Berengaria of Portugal married Valdemar II, king of Denmark. How on earth would a medieval Portuguese princess and a Danish king meet, you might ask, but there was an indirect connection as Valdemar’s sister, Ingeborg, was unfortunate enough to marry Berengaria’s French cousin, Philippe Augustus. This is why Berengaria was in Paris, and

The three brothers – the story of a Portuguese princess and how she was blamed for the sins of her sons Read More »