Writing

Meet Walter Raleigh – courtier, poet and adventurer!

Today, I am proud to host a stop on Tony Riches’ blog tour for his latest book, Raleigh.  Like most of his books, this his latest offering is set in Tudor times, which, as some of you may know, is not my favourite era. At all. But I make an exception for Tony Riches’ books, …

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With me or against me? How I became my own greatest enemy

Five years ago, I was given an ultimatum by a doctor: lose weight or we’ll not be able to do surgery on your back. And without surgery, you’re going to be in excruciating pain for the rest of your life, your mobility severely restricted. Huh. That didn’t sound much fun. I mean, I liked to …

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Lost and Found – a reflection on friendship

Our lives are defined by relationships: parents, siblings, spouses/partners, children – they all affect who we are and how we evolve. As do friends. My BFF once gave me a magnet which says “Friends are the family we choose ourselves”, and while I am (mostly) quite happy with the family I have, she does have …

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The Brantford Wagers – highlighting a book about a female “artful dodger” in Regency times

  Today, I have the pleasure of hosting a stop on Ms Kampen’s blog tour for her recent release The Brantford Wagers. Ms Kampen has set her story in the perennially popular Regency period, and speaking for myself, I love escaping into a well-written historical romance. Besides, the young Ms Vincent sounds like an intriguing …

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Oh, mighty Muse, I bow before thee – or a writer’s odd relationship with her subconscious

All writers have some sort of muse. Some call it their “mojo”, others – especially if they’re Spanish-speaking – may call it “duende”.  Some writers don’t have a name for this invisible presence that sometimes breathes VERY heavily down their neck. Me, I call my muse Ms Inspiration. I envision a lady of multiple contradictions: …

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The Prisoner of Paradise – or what happens when you obsess over a painting

I must admit being quite intrigued when I read the blurb to Mr Samborn’s book, The Prisoner of Paradise. I am rather fond of stories that take their starting point in works of art, and in this case it is Tintoretto’s gigantic masterpiece, Paradise, in Venice that has Mr Samborn’s protagonist utterly enthralled. Not that …

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It is all in the details – the toil of a historical novelist

Writing novels set in the distant past has its disadvantages. Like when your heroine ends up in a situation where you just know she’s dying for a piece of chocolate – except that chocolate hasn’t been invented yet. Or when the scene you’ve just written calls for cold fingers clasped around the comforting warmth of …

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Blog tour: A King under Siege – Ms Rochelle’s take on Richard II

Today I am happy to yet again work with The Coffee Pot Book Club and host a stop on Mercedes Rochelle’s blog tour for her book A King Under Siege. This book is set in the late 14th century, and as evidenced by Ms Rochelle’s posts about the various movers and shakers in the period, …

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A man and his women – meet abolitionist John Brown in Susan Higginbottham’s book!

Today, I am hosting a stop on Ms Higginbottham’s Coffee Pot Book Club Tour featuring her excellent book John Brown’s Women. I knew who John Brown was – like many of you, I’d grown up singing about him – so I was pretty intrigued when I was asked to host this tour. I was, however, …

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