historical fiction

More Wonderful authors – Meet Elizabeth St John and Terry Tyler

Time for my next Indie author duo, the third in my series “The Wonderful Life of an Indie Author”. Today, I’ve paired a lady who writes post-apocalyptical series and thrillers with a writer of 17th century historicals – maybe because Terry Tyler has written a number of books set in present time but with the …

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The Wonderful life of an indie writer – meet Helen and Lisette!

I have decided to broaden my blog a bit by doing a series of posts about Indie writers. My first thought was to feature five or so in one post, but I must have disconnected my brain when I had that idea seeing as I forgot that authors in general are verbal creatures, i.e. the …

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The king’s man – new book about Tudor England

If you enjoy well-researched historicals and haven’t discovered Tony Riches yet, you’re in for a treat. I have read his Tudor trilogy and, as a consequence, ended up reassessing Henry VII whom I had always considered a rascally usurper, no more, no less. Tony paints a far more complex character of the man who grasped …

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Historical Fiction – a genre or an umbrella?

Sometimes, people ask me why I write historical fiction. “Why such a difficult genre?” they ask, which in itself makes me a tad irritated, as historical fiction, IMO, is not a genre – it’s an umbrella under which all other genres coexist. In essence, the “historical” in historical fiction merely indicates that the story is …

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Digging up the Tudor roots

Okay, I’m going to come clean: I am NOT a major Tudor fan. I’ve had it up to here (waves hand around eye level) with novels featuring Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. Likewise with Elizabeth I – undoubtedly an intriguing lady – maybe not so much with Mary Tudor. Which is why I surprised myself …

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Sunny days and summer reads – a new book & a giveaway!

The other day, I published my tenth book. I’m starting to feel like one of those ladies back in medieval times who popped out a baby a year and probably worried how on earth she was to feed and clothe them, let alone love them all. Except, of course, that one always loves one’s babies, …

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Making real people work for you

I write Historical Fiction. While my protagonists are entirely fictional, they now and then have to interact with “real” people – people who’ve existed, lived and died for real. This can be something of a bummer – especially when your perfectly crafted timeline suddenly crashes headlong into the wall of historical facts. That conversation your …

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Why the 17th century? A declaration of love

If one is going to be financially successful as a writer of historical fiction, one should write about the Tudors. Or about Rome – or medieval England. Maybe even Regency (especially when thinking Romance). Somehow, the 17th century exists in a bubble of obscurity, trapped between the great drama of the 16th century and the …

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Ripping through the veils of time

Admit it. Of course you’ve fantasized about travelling through time. What? Is that a “no”? Can’t hear you honey, so I’m going to assume all of you, dear people, are nodding. Okay, so most of you smile somewhat at all this time travelling stuff, being quite content to remain exactly where you are – well, …

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The travails of a newly published author

Publishing a book bears a remarked resemblance to being stuck in a hole and yelling “Hello? Can anybody hear me?” Just because the book is there, it doesn’t automatically sell itself, nor do reviews start pouring in from right left and center. Okay, okay; my book is still a baby, a mere two or three …

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