Historical People

“Lately the king’s enemy and rebel” – when good intentions lead to treason

Most people live out their lives in obscurity—something to be grateful for, I believe, as celebrity comes with its own set of challenges. Many people live below the radar for most of their lives, but then a sequence of events propel them onto the central stage and for a while their name is on everybody’s …

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The second wife – of Yolande of Hungary, Queen of Aragon

Sometimes, I wonder if medieval people were more in a hurry to live their lives, seeing as so many of them died at ages we would consider to be relatively young. Death, it would seem, sent its icy breath along their nape from the moment those medieval peeps were born. Obviously, Death is as present …

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Much Medieval Mayhem – meet a writer lady with a crush on a medieval lady

Today, I am proud to welcome Sharon Bennett Connolly to my blog. She has published several non-fiction books set in the medieval period and I am very much looking forward to her next release which will focus on the de Warenne family—Norman in origin, this noble family was quite the power-house for well over two …

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Loving all his imperfections – in remembrance of Roger Mortimer. who died #otd 1330

An author setting out to write a fictionalised version of historical events must decide from what point of view these events will be related. After all, if I were to write from Hugh Despenser the Younger’s perspective, the rebellious barons led by Roger Mortimer of Wigmore and Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, were a nasty lot …

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Woe, the unloved wife – of Joan of Bar and her not-so-loving hubby, John de Warenne

In a previous post, I wrote about Eleanor, eldest surviving daughter of Edward I and his wife, Eleanor of Castile. That poor lady was destined for a short life, but she lived long enough to marry and have two children, one born in 1295 or so, the second born a year later. When Eleanor died, …

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Much Medieval Mayhem – meet a present day Lady of Mercia!

Today’s guest is a person I admire greatly. I love how deftly she weaves history and plot together, how gently she breathes life into her characters. I cry when I read her books. I smile. I experience smells and sounds and sights. More than anything, I become utterly submerged in a world that lies more …

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The royal giant – of Lionel, prince of England

History is littered with people whose lives are forgotten. Most of the people who have lived and died in the past have done so in obscurity and this also applies to the high-born. We know they were born, we may now when they died, but unless they were in line to become king or queen …

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Much Medieval Mayhem – in which Helen talks of Harold, arrows and the dastardly Conqueror

Today I have the great pleasure to welcome Helen Hollick to Much Medieval Mayhem. Helen is a person who has been very important to me—and many, many others—in my writing journey. Generous with her time and advice (very direct advice at times), Helen seems to imbibe directly from a constant source of energy, how else …

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The hand that held the axe that killed the king

I find it very improbable that there has ever been a little boy who looked up from his morning porridge and told his proud parents that when he grew up, he wanted to be an executioner. Nor do I think any parent would have been overly thrilled had their beloved son expressed such a desire. …

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The bride wore white for the first time ever. Meet a15th century trendsetter

Quite some time ago, I wrote about Margareta of Denmark, a rather impressive woman who ended up as the de facto ruler of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. When Margareta died in 1412, her adopted son Erik of Pommerania took over the reins of government, and I suspect this thirty-year-old man was more than thrilled to be …

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