historical fiction

Ships that pass

Today I have a real treat for you, peeps. As part of her two-week swashbuckling voyage round blogosphere Helen Hollick is visiting – or dropping anchor, as she herself puts it – and what would Helen write about if not pirates? Well, she could write about King Arthur, of course. Or Queen Emma. Or Harold  …

Ships that passRead More »

How expansive ambitions led to revolution

Today, I have the honour of being visited by Paul Bennett, who not only maintains an excellent review site, Hoover Book Reviews, but also writes books about set in the Americas during the decades leading up to the War of Independence. An interesting and not so often depicted period, IMO, which is why I felt …

How expansive ambitions led to revolutionRead More »

Killing my darlings

The drawback about writing books set in the past is that any ”real” character one decides to include is dead. There is no ambiguity there, no leeway for twisting things slightly so that the person in question gets to enjoy some years of sunset and peace before passing on—not if the facts unequivocally state that …

Killing my darlingsRead More »

Into the Lion’s Den

Today, Suzanne Adair is visiting me with a fascinating story about William Hooper, famous for being one of the men who signed the American Declaration of Independence. Suzanne is the author of a series set in Revolutionary America and Mr Hooper pops by in her latest instalment. Well: enough intro, already – allow me to …

Into the Lion’s DenRead More »

Dragging an obscure Viking boy into the light

Those of you who pop by my blog regularly will know by now that I spend a lot of time in Britain and Spain, mostly in medieval times or in the seventeenth century. Now and then I do dip into Nordic history, but in general those forays are rare. Today, I thought I’d introduce you …

Dragging an obscure Viking boy into the lightRead More »

Rubbing the wrong face in the dirt – of Mortimer, King Arthur and tournaments

In the summer of 1329, Roger Mortimer invited more or less every nobleman in England to Wigmore, the hereditary home of the Mortimers. He was planning a major tournament, several days of fun and fighting followed by feasting. A veritable city of tents were pitched outside the walls of the castle as knights from all …

Rubbing the wrong face in the dirt – of Mortimer, King Arthur and tournamentsRead More »

Mary, Mary quite contrary – except she wasn't

Today I’ve invited Tony Riches (more about him can be found at the end of this post) to pop by with a guest post about his latest book, Mary – Tudor Princess. And no, this is not a book about the Mary who would go on to become Mary I, but rather about Mary, younger …

Mary, Mary quite contrary – except she wasn'tRead More »

Dead #otd: Roger Mortimer

There are a couple of death dates I know by heart: Being Swedish, I know the death date of Karl XII who died in Norway November 30, 1718 purportedly having been shot by one of his own with a button. Hmm. Since then the button part has been dismissed, but whether or not he was …

Dead #otd: Roger MortimerRead More »

Going back to my roots – or why there now are NINE books in The Graham Saga

Today is the publication date for the ninth book in the Graham Saga. Ninth. What began as a book (with a very sad and depressing ending involving two lonely people dying far, far from each other) developed into a saga and by now I am quite convinced Matthew and Alex and their large family are …

Going back to my roots – or why there now are NINE books in The Graham SagaRead More »

Ælfgyva, The Mystery Lady of The Bayeux Tapestry

For many years the presence of a lady known as Ælfgyva on the Bayeux Tapestry has baffled historians. No one knows who she is or why she is depicted on the tapestry. Today’s guest, Paula Lofting, spends most of her free time researching the 11th century (and writing great books set in the period). She …

Ælfgyva, The Mystery Lady of The Bayeux TapestryRead More »